Office of Undergraduate Instruction

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.

Offered               

Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites    

Fundamentals of Cell and Developmental Biology 01:146:270

Course Description         

Developmental biology is a diverse and rapidly changing field. This course integrates molecular, cellular and organismal approaches to address problems of cell differentiation, morphogenesis and pattern formation, organ formation, growth and reproduction. Different organisms are introduced as model systems for analysis.   Contemporary health and ethics issues relevant to developmental biology are also considered in this course.

Course URL        

The course makes use of the Sakai website for posting lecture materials and supplementary information.

Course Satisfies Learning Goals 

1. Master factual and conceptual knowledge in cell biology and neuroscience that will provide a solid foundation for success in advanced training and professional careers.

2. Develop an ability to summarize, integrate and organize information.

3. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the potential for current research and new discoveries to improve our understanding of cell biology and neuroscience and its relevance to human health and to our society.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy             

There will be a total of three exams. Two of these exams will be held during regularly scheduled class periods. The last exam will be given as a final exam. All students will maintain a learning journal that will be submitted for evaluation three times during the semester. All students will be required to submit a written review of a current research article in the field of developmental biology. Graduate students (all students registered for 148:504) will be expected to write a short research review paper and make a presentation on the topic to the class. The format and topic of the paper must be approved in advance.

Course Materials             

Required Text: DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 11th Edition, by Scott Gilbert. Published by Oxford University Press, USA.

ISBN 978-1605354705

Course Closed?

Contact Dr. Hyndman via email for special permission numbers This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Faculty 

Dr. Arnold G. Hyndman

** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

This course  fulfills the molecular biology requirement of the CBN major.

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.


Offered

Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I 01:160:307  Pre- or Corequisite: Organic Chemistry II 01:160:308

Course Description

Structure and function of macromolecules, recombinant DNA technology, and study of genes and their regulation at the molecular and cellular levels.

 Time:     Tuesdays and Fridays - 2nd period (10:20 - 11:40 am)

Place:    ARC 105, Allison Road Classroom Building, Busch Campus

Course URL

Sakai 146:478

Course Satisfies Learning Goals

1. Master factual and conceptual knowledge in Molecular Biology- to help better understand current developments in  many disciplines of life sciences including neurobiology and cell and developmental biology.

2. Develop an ability to integrate information, to deduce and reason, to query and interrogate scientific observations and conclusions.

3. To better understand the utility and relevance of science in our everyday existence. Examples include, but are not limited to: molecular biology and genetically modified organisms (GMO), GMO in our food supply; molecular biology and disease etiology-from beta thalessemia, cystic fibrosis, to neurodegeneration.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

1st hourly: 20 points

2nd hourly: 20 points

Problem sets & conference participation: 20 points

Final exam: 40 points.

Exams are closed book and students are expected to follow the Rutgers Academic Integrity Code.

Course Materials

 (1) Molecular Biology, 5th edition (2012) – available at RU Bookstore.

                                          ISBN 978-0-07-352532-7   

                                          Robert F. Weaver,  WCB/McGraw-Hill

Course Closed?

If this course is closed, please use the following link to add your name to the wait list:.Wait List Sign Up for Spring 2018 Courses . If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences - Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or visit our office at Nelson Biological Laboratories B112, Busch Campus.

Faculty

Dr. Alice Y.-C. Liu
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.             848-445-2730
Office hours: Wednesdays 12:00 noon - 1:00 pm or by appointment


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

This course may be used to fulfill the elective and laboratory requirements of the Biological Sciences major.


Offered

Spring

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Prerequisite:  01:119:117 or 01:119:102  Pre- or Corequisite: Immunology 01:146:474

Course Description

The overall objective of this course is to give the advanced biology student experience with addressing immunological questions through experimentation. A representative experiment will be the analysis of different lymphocyte subsets in distinct lymphoid tissues of the mouse. Specific techniques will analyze RNA and protein expression in different immune cell populations and explore the functions of these unique cells.

Representative Syllabus (may be slightly modified year to year):

Title of Lab

1. Isolation of mouse spleen mononuclear cells by density gradient centrifugation

2. Natural resistance to infection and isolation of lymphoid tissues

3. Cytotoxic activity of an activated macrophage cell line

4. Characterization of T cell populations isolated from mouse spleen and thymus

5. Flow cytometry analysis of cells

6. Preparation of RNA from mouse tissues

7. RT-PCR as a method for identifying CD4 expression in different murine lymphoid tissues

8. Western blot analysis of a B cell-specific protein in human B cells

Course URL

Sakai website will be active during the semester

Course Satisfies Learning Goals

1. Master factual and conceptual knowledge in Immunology that will provide a solid foundation for success in advanced training and professional careers.

2. Develop an ability to summarize, integrate and organize information and relate it to disease outcomes

3. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the potential for current research and new discoveries to improve our understanding of immunology and its relevance to human health and to our society.

4. Use experimental techniques to address immunological questions.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

 Grades are weighted most heavily on four lab reports and/or presentation. Attendance and participation in the labs are also factors in the final grade. There will also be a quiz that tests the principles in Lab Assignment #1.

Course Materials

Lab manual

Course Closed?

If this course is closed, please use the following link to add your name to the wait list: Wait List Sign Up for Spring 2018 Courses If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences - Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or visit our office at Nelson Biological Laboratories B112, Busch Campus.

Faculty

Course Coordinator:

Dr. Covey
B314 Nelson Hall
848-445-4777
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Other Faculty Participants:

Dr. Xie
B336 Nelson Labs
(848) 445-0802
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Schwander
B319 Nelson Labs
(848) 445-2709
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Firestein
D411 Nelson Hall
(848)445-8045
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Kiledjian
B303 Nelson Hall
848-445-0796
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.


Offered 

Spring 2018 and Fall 2018 (moving forward the course will only be taught in the Fall semesters)

Credits 

3

Prerequisites 

General Biology 01:119:115-116 or 01:119:101-102

Genetics 01:447:380 or 01:447:384

Recommended: General Microbiology 01:447:390

Course Description 

Fundamental principles of immunology with emphasis on innate and humoral immune responses, as well as the generation of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes and proteins. We will also study the immune response and how it is related to diseases, including hypersensitivity reactions, autoimmunity, bacterial and viral infections (including HIV) and cancer.

Course URL 

The Sakai website will be active during the semester

Course satisfies Learning Goals 

1. Master factual and conceptual knowledge in Immunology that will provide a solid foundation for success in advanced training and professional careers.

2. Develop an ability to summarize, integrate and organize information and relate it to disease outcomes

3. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the potential for current research and new discoveries to improve our understanding of immunology and its relevance to human health  in our society as well as globally.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy 

4 exams will be given that will cover approximately the same amount of material.  There is no comprehensive final. The fourth exam will be given at the scheduled time in the Final Exam Period.  Exams will consist primarily of multiple-choice questions but may have short essay questions as well.  Quizzes, which will be accessed through the Sakai website, may be given at the discretion of the instructor and if given, will constitute up to 5% of the final grade.

Course Materials 

Janeway's Immunobiology. Murphy, 8th Edition

Course Closed? 

If this course is closed, please use the following link to add your name to the wait list: Wait List Sign Up for Spring 2018 Courses If you have any questions, please contact the Division of Life Sciences - Office of Undergraduate Instruction at 848-445-2075 or visit our office at Nelson Biological Laboratories B112, Busch Campus.

Faculty 

Course Coordinator:

Dr. Lori Covey
B314 Nelson Hall
732-445-4777
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Participating Faculty:

Dr. Ping Xie
Room B336
Nelson Biology Laboratories
Busch Campus
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

This course is intended for Life Science majors or those with a strong background in the Biological Sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.

This course is not being offered in Spring 2017

Offered

Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Advanced Neurobiology I 01:146:445 and 01:119:117 or 01:119:102

Course Description

Advanced laboratory methods in Neurobiology. Electrophysiological and immunohistochemical techniques will be used to explore the functional and structural features of nerve cells. The course consists of three multi-week projects that focus on voltage-gated potassium channels in N2a cells and the whole-cell ionic currents in hippocampal neurons. The laboratory environment is open and students are encouraged to work independently.

Techniques covered:

  • Microelectrode fabrication
  • Use of inverted microscopes and micromanipulators
  • Use of computer-controlled data acquisition hardware
  • Single-channel voltage-clamp
  • Whole-cell voltage-clamp
  • Whole-cell current clamp

Course URL

Sakai

Course Satisfies Learning Goals

1. Master factual and conceptual knowledge in neuroscience that will provide a solid foundation for success in advanced training and professional careers.

2. Develop an ability to summarize, integrate and organize information.

3. Use scientific reasoning to evaluate the potential for current research and new discoveries to improve our understanding of the nervous system and its relevance to human health and to our society.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Three laboratory reports (one from each of the projects) as well as participation in class meetings and discussions

Course Materials

Supplied protocols and assigned papers

Course Closed?

Enrollment is by special permission only. Please contact the course instructor for more information.

Faculty

Dr. Mark Plummer
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

Contact Us

Nelson Biological Laboratories

Nelson Biological Laboratories
604 Allison Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854


p. (848) 445-2075
f.  (732) 445-5870