Office of Undergraduate Instruction

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.


Offered

Fall   This course is not offered in Fall 2016

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Genetics 01:447:380 or Genetic Analysis I 01:447:384 and General Biology Lab 01:119:117 or 01:119:102

Course Description

This course is aimed at students who plan to pursue research careers, attend graduate school, or enter the biomedical/research workforce.

The main goal of the course is:

* To learn how to analyze the primary scientific literature

* To understand how hypotheses are formulated

* To understand how experiments are performed

* To understand how data is analyzed and interpreted

The course focuses on multiple layers of control of gene expression in eukaryotes, and how the underlying mechanisms are studied using molecular genetic approaches. These approaches will be illustrated using several well-known example topics. These specific topics will include:

(1) Growth factor signaling

(2) Programmed Cell Death

(3) RNAi and MicroRNAs

(4) Gene regulation in the brain

(5) The genetics of learning and memory

(6) The genetics of behavior

Course satisfies Departmental Learning Goals

1. Knowledge specific goals: Know the terms, concepts and theories in genetics.

2. Integrate the material from multiple courses and research. That is, to think holistically and to see the whole as well as the parts.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

4 exams and daily in-class assessments

Course Materials

Assigned research papers, textbook TBA

Course Closed?

If this course is closed please contact the Office of Undergraduate Instruction to be placed on the waiting list.

 

Faculty

TBA

 


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

 

This course is intended for Life Science majors or those with a strong background in the Biological Sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.


Offered

Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Genetics 01:447:380 or Genetic Analysis I 01:447:384 and General Biology Lab 01:119:117 or 01:119:102

Credit not given for this course and Introduction to Cancer 01:447:245

Course Description

This is an advanced course covering the biological and medical aspects of malignancy. It includes cancer cells and tumors, cancer genomics and proteomics, and examples of human cancers (breast, prostate, colon, melanoma, etc.). Each week the professor will introduce a topic in a lecture, assign readings from the published biomedical research literature, and in the next class period lead a discussion of the assigned readings.

Topics may include:

  • Pathology of neoplasia
  • Successful therapies based on molecular targets
  • Cancer stem cells
  • Tumor microenvironment and host interaction
  • Invasion and Metastasis
  • Cancer gene expression
  • Cancer genomics
  • Cancer proteomics
  • RNAi and microRNAs
  • Model systems of human cancer
  • Tumor progression and chemoprevention
  • Mathematical oncology

Learning Goals

This course has been certified as satisfying learning goals of the Department of Genetics, and the SAS Core Curriculum goals.

Department of Genetics Goals:

3. Use genetic information and ideas to critically analyze published research articles in genetics.

4. (in part) At the end of four years, all our students will be able to design an experiment, carry out the research using appropriate laboratory techniques and analyze and interpret their data. They will also be able to communicate their discoveries through a written article appropriate for publication in a peer-reviewed Genetics journal, and through talks or posters appropriate for scientific meetings.

SAS Core Curriculum Goals:

This course satisfies the SAS requirement for "Cognitive Skills and Processes: Discipline-Based Writing and Communication [WCd]".

This course meets the following SAS Writing and Communication goals:

t. Communicate effectively in modes appropriate to a discipline or area of inquiry.

u. Evaluate and critically assess sources and use the conventions of attribution and citation correctly.

v. Analyze and synthesize information and idea from multiple soureces to generate new insights.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

During the course, students will be expected to demonstrate in several written assignments their understanding of the facts and concepts of the lecture material and of the assigned readings (40%). At the end of the course students will be expected to demonstrate that they can use facts and concepts about cancer learned in the course, and new material which they find in the published literature, by proposing new avenues of research in a written final term paper in the form of a research proposal (abstract, critical review of the literature, research plan) (40%). Class participation in discussions (10%).

Course Materials

Readings online at Library of Science and Medicine website, handouts on course Sakai website.  

Course Closed?

No special permission numbers will be administered for this course. If the course is closed you should continue to check WebReg to see if a spot opens.

Faculty

David E. Axelrod
Dept. Genetics
Nelson Biolabs, Room B341
phone: 445-2011


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

 

 

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.

Offered

Fall    

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Genetics 01:447:380 or Genetic Analysis I 01:447:384. Requires departmental permission to register.

Course Description

This is a foundational graduate course in human genetics, covering classical and non-classical patterns of inheritance, human genome structure and evolution, normal and abnormal processes of gene expression, molecular genetic pathology, laboratory methods for genetic analysis, and research approaches to the study of human genetic disease using humans and model organisms. There will be homework assignments, a midterm and final. The course is cross-listed with 16:681:535 (Graduate Human Genetics); thus, student taking the course will comprise a mixture of senior undergraduates and graduate students.

Course URL

https://sakai.rutgers.edu (login with your Rutgers NetID)

Course Goals

The goals of this Human Genetics course are to provide students a foundation in the key biological concepts and experimental methodologies of human genetics. Specific course objectives
are to:

1.Comprehend and apply knowledge of human genetics as it relates to a variety of topics
including inheritance patterns, population and quantitative genetics, and epigenetics

2. Appreciate a variety of genetic and genomic testing technologies and understand their application and utility, in both research and clinical settings

3. Understand the basis of human variation and disease

4.Understand the utility and limitations of model organism research and how such work leads to advances in the understanding and treatment of human genetic disease

Course Satisfies Departmental Learning Goals

1. Knowledge specific goals: Know the terms, concepts and theories in genetics

2. Integrate the material from multiple courses and research. That is, to think holistically and to see the whole as well as the parts

3. Use genetic information and ideas to critically analyze published research articles in genetics.

4. Be able to communicate scientific research through written papers and verbal presentations.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

35% Homeworks and quiz grades

25% Midterm Exam

40% Final exam (cumulative)

Course Materials

RECOMMENDED TEXT
Human Molecular Genetics, 4th ed. By Tom Strachan and Andrew Read
ISBN-10: 0815341490
ISBN-13: 978-081534149-9

Course Closed?

If the course is closed, please use the following link to ad your name to the wait list: Wait List Sign Up for Fall 2017 Courses.  If you have any questions, please contact Kathleen McDonald in the Genetics Undergraduate Office (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Faculty

Dr. Linda Brzustowicz

Life Science Building 231

Phone: 848-445-3125

email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dr. Maureen Barr

Life Science Building 324

Phone: 848-445-3125

email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

This is a challenging course with considerable theoretical content. The course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Genetics major and Biological Sciences major.

The course has also been taken by many graduate students in the past.


Offered

Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Genetics 01:447:380 or Genetic Analysis I 01:447:384 and General Biology Lab 01:119:117 or 01:119:102

Course Description

The course will begin by focusing on the origins of genes, and the origins of life, and on how evolutionary processes may have begun on earth. As the course develops, it will include a theoretical component, in which the action of different evolutionary mechanisms, like natural selection, genetic drift, and speciation, can be modeled for genes. Later in the semester we will cover other topics in molecular evolution and molecular phylogenetics. The course will also thoroughly cover practical methods for the evolutionary analysis of DNA sequences.

Course satisfies Learning Goals

Students will learn about evolution from the perspective of genetics, including mathematical theory of how genes evolves. Students will apply the ideas and methods they have learned to analyze a data set drawn from published research, and write a paper on the results of their analysis.

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Tentative exam and grading policy.

There will be three quizzes (all announced well ahead of time) during the semester. The lowest of the three quiz grades will be dropped.

The overall quiz grade will be 30% of the final grade.

There will be a project that will involve the use of computer programs for the evolutionary analysis of a data set of DNA sequences. A significant part of the course will be devoted to learning how to use web-based computer programs for evolutionary analyses.

The project grade will be 30% of the final grade.

There will be a final exam that will make up 40% of the final grade.

Course Materials

Tentative Text Selections for Fall 2010

The Origins of Life: From the Birth of Life to the Origin of Language (Paperback)
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019286209X

The Selfish Gene (Paperback)
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 30th Anniversary edition
ISBN: 0199291152

Fundamentals of Molecular Evolution (Paperback)
Publisher: Sinauer Associates; 2nd edition (January 15, 2000)
ISBN: 0878932666

Course Closed?

No special permission numbers will be administered for this course. If the course is closed you should continue to check WebReg to see if a spot opens.

 

Faculty

Dr. Andrew Kern


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

This course is intended for Life Science majors or those with a strong background in the Biological Sciences.

This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of the Biological Sciences major.


Offered

Fall                      Please note this course is not offered Fall 2016

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Genetics 01:447:380 or Genetic Analysis I 01:447:384 and General Biology Lab 01:119:117 or 01:119:102

Course Description

This is a course that will use both a text book and the literature to survey how mutations are isolated and analyzed. The emphasis will be on the methods and strategies used to identify mutations and interpret genetic information. The student will learn how to combine classical genetics, molecular biology and genomics to answer important questions about gene structure and function. To quote the textbook, this course is "not so much about what we have learned, that will continue to change, but rather how we have learned it". That said, the learning process is based on examining real experiments and data drawn from a range of model organisms and humans involving processes such as development, the cell cycle, DNA repair, mitosis, and meiosis.  

Course Satisfies Departmental Learning Goals

1. Know the terms, concepts and theories of genetic analysis.

2. Integrate the material from multiple courses and research. That is, to think holistically and to see the whole as well as the parts.

3. Use genetic information and ideas to critically analyze published research articles in genetics.

4. Students will be able to design an experiment, analyze and interpret data and able to communicate the discoveries.

Course URL

Sakai

Exams, Assignments, and Grading Policy

Grades will be based on three in class exams and daily quizzes

Course Materials

Required Textbook: Genetic Analysis by Philip Meneely ISBN: 9780199651818

Course Closed?

If this course is closed, please contact Kathleen McDonald in the Genetics Undergraduate Office (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) to obtain special permission to register.

 

Faculty

Dr. Natalia Morsci

 


** All information is subject to change at the discretion of the course coordinator.

 

Contact Us

Nelson Biological Laboratories

Nelson Biological Laboratories
604 Allison Rd
Piscataway, NJ 08854


p. (848) 445-2075
f.  (732) 445-5870